Quoting Nietzsche

Johnnie Moore

Johnnie Moore

I’m Johnnie Moore, and I help people work better together

I’ve never had any excuse to quote Nietzsche in this blog. (For someone with a a degree in Philosophy I have a hard time spelling the name never mind reading any). But Andrew Sullivan or more precisely one of his readers, came up with this meaty chunk that I really appreciated.

The church fights passion with excision in every sense: its practice, its “cure,” is castratism. It never asks: “How can one spiritualize, beautify, deify a craving?” It has at all times laid the stress of discipline on extirpation (of sensuality, of pride, of the lust to rule, of avarice, of vengefulness). But an attack on the roots of passion means an attack on the roots of life: the practice of the church is hostile to life. The same means in the fight against a craving–castration, extirpation–is instinctively chosen by those who are too weak-willed, too degenerate, to be able to impose moderation on themselves; by those who are so constituted that they require La Trappe, to use a figure of speech, or (without any figure of speech) some kind of definitive declaration of hostility, a cleft between themselves and the passion. Radical means are indispensable only for the degenerate; the weakness of the will–or, to speak more definitely, the inability not to respond to a stimulus–is itself merely another form of degeneration. The radical hostility, the deadly hostility against sensuality, is always a symptom to reflect on: it entitles us to suppositions concerning the total state of one who is excessive in this manner.

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