The Lovemarks debate: where is it?

Johnnie Moore

Johnnie Moore

I’m Johnnie Moore, and I help people work better together

Well it looks like Lovemarks is getting a lot of heat in the blogosphere at the moment. As Hugh recounts, the Cluetrain authors have all kicked in and Doc Searls highlights a Technorati search that starts to show the amount of debate already going on.

Mind you, I’ve had plenty to say myself on this topic in recent months. Including some Beyond Lovemarks ideas on what I think might be better.

Meanwhile the comments to my recent update have got quite lively.

Stanley Moss is a sceptic about my suggestion that Kevin Roberts joins the debate:

I suspect he will never opt for a public debate. His worldview was shaped by his days in advertising, controlling messages. So I say, Let the clamour continue.

Tom Asaker suggests a way to involve Kevin Roberts a bit more

Want to drag him into the brawl? Drag Tom Peters in! Go to his blog – www.tompeters.com – and challenge Tom to bring along his pal Kevin. Get a little firery – in a pseudointellectual fashion – and then dare Peters to ignore you. Go ahead bloggers. I dare you. I double dare you!

If this doesn’t work, I’ll eat every branded food in Kevin’s book!

Evelyn Rodriquez seems to like this idea too:

I think Tom Asacker hit on a good idea. I think the way to make sure Kevin is listening is via Tom Peters. I don’t have that many mentions myself but it sometimes takes me even weeks to see a citation/reference online.

Well, that’s one way to go I guess. But as I said before, having met Kevin Robert’s partner in NZ, they should really get a Lovemarks blog going and host the debate themselves.

And then again, the great thing about the blogosphere is that the debate will find its own home anyway. Although it would be good for the Lovemarks team to host the debate, in the end the conversation takes care of itself. And then the only question is… where’s Kevin? That’s Cluetrain for you.

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